Dig Deeper?

Upon reading the third chapter of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, I once again find myself circling around the fact that this is a children’s book. Glimpses of deeper meaning present itself after the second read through, but first impression wise, I merely see an enjoyable tale written for the entertainment of children and adults alike. The amount of time Carroll spent writing Alice’s adventures was not long, and it seems safe to assume his first priority was to create a story any child would enjoy. The Lory who claims to be older than Alice, and must therefore “know better” would be a figure most children can relate to. A parent or perhaps a sibling may say something to that similar effect. The mention of prizes, also seem to show Carrol’s understanding of kids. For kids the idea of a prize is like an irresistible shiny object to play with.

However even with the interest of the children taking first priority, we must not forget the nature of the author. Carroll was a mathematician who loved to create puzzles for the mind. His writing seem to provoke thought, allowing any person to notice a few coincidences. It may be that Carroll could not completely cut off his own voice and instead hid it in the double meanings of his words. There are times when speculation seems apparent, and times when all the events seem random. This may have been intentional, a simple puzzling tale given to deeper thought, if pursued.

The reader perceives each story in their own way, in a sense it is the reader’s story as well. By creating something that connects to every level of intelligence, Carroll satisfies a wide range of audiences. From young children, to teens, to adults. He balances his own love of questioning with just the right amount of nonsense, leaving one curious for more. In the end it is up to you, as to how you would like to interpret Alice’s Adcentures in Wonderland.

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1 Comment

  1. What an absolutely lovely way to put it all into perspective:

    “The reader perceives each story in their own way, in a sense it is the reader’s story as well. By creating something that connects to every level of intelligence, Carroll satisfies a wide range of audiences. From young children, to teens, to adults. He balances his own love of questioning with just the right amount of nonsense, leaving one curious for more.”

    Great point about it being “the reader’s story as well”. Bravo.


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  • Welcome to the “Alice Project”

    What happens when a group of insightful 10th grade students explore Alice's journey into Wonderland?