The “Hero’s Journey” of Alice (part 3)

After studying Joseph Campbell’s “hero journey”, a concept we were introduced to by Mr. Long and later discussed with Matt Langdon,  a visiting expert on the “hero” model who has been commenting on the blogs lately, I am very quickly realizing many, if not all, stories are based off of these steps. Of course there are different ways of approaching this concept like my partner Adam realized in his blog The-Not-So-Heroic-Journey. It all depends on your perspective.

(Note: If you’re interested in these ideas, feel free to check out the earlier posts my classmates and I blogged about Joseph Campbell’s “hero journey”, too, if you want.)

Photobucket
I left off observing that one of the significances of Alice’s journey through Wonderland was the lessons she has learned to reach her goals.

Once Alice reaches the Queen’s grounds and discovers that all of the rules are unfair and she could quickly lose her head, Alice does not once say she wants to go back home. Either she forgot about her home or has way too many thoughts tossing and turning throughout her head. No one may know, yet as contrast to her previous self Alice strives to find a solution to her problem of finding her way out of the Queen’s grounds while keeping her head.

Not so much as a magic flight, yet Alice does get away from the Queen’s executions for awhile when she meets the Mock Turtle. This leads me to the rescue from without, aka Alice’s final guides. The Gryphon and the Mock Turtle remind Alice of the “real” world and allows her to remember she doesn’t want to stay in Wonderland forever.

The Queen’s court allows Alice to cross the final threshold and master the two worlds in which she has entered into. She uses her wisdom gained from her journey to realize “’You’re nothing but a pack of cards!” and discover her control on herself.

This ends Alice’s journey and allows her to use her newly found knowledge in the “real” world and live in the moment, as many people would say.

Hope you enjoyed “The “Hero’s Journey” of Alice” and I hope some of these thoughts encouraged you to think of even more questions and answers! Also feel free to read  “The “Hero’s Journey” of Alice” part 1 and 2 (click here) and feel free to check out my team’s blogs on the right side of your screen!

Image 1 can be found here.

The “Hero’s Journey” of Alice (part 2)

After studying Joseph Campbell’s “hero journey”, a concept we were introduced to by Mr. Long and later discussed with Matt Langdon,  a visiting expert on the “hero” model who has been commenting on the blogs lately, I am very quickly realizing many, if not all, stories are based off of these steps. Of course there are different ways of approaching this concept like my partner Adam realized in his blog The-Not-So-Heroic-Journey. It all depends on your perspective.

(Note: If you’re interested in these ideas, feel free to check out the earlier posts my classmates and I blogged about Joseph Campbell’s “hero journey”, too, if you want. Also to see Part 1 of The “Hero’s Journey of Alice click here.)

Photobucket
I left off pinpointing the road of trials which I believed have been occurring sense she arrived into the hallway of doors. After finishing the book I still agree with my assumption.

Now, assuming these steps are supposed to go in the order they are represented in, a meeting with the goddess is to be seen. The goddess does not necessarily have to be a woman or a human; it should represent what the hero/heroine loves most completely. I concur that Dinah, Alice’s cat, would be the perfect match for this step. Alice refers to Dinah in many of the beginning chapters until she overcomes her dependence on Dinah and gains confidence in herself.

As for the temptations, there are too many to count in Alice’s adventure. Without temptation, there can be no story.

The Cheshire Cat is the “father figure” to Alice and thus completes the atonement with the father. The Cheshire Cat appears throughout Alice’s journey and aids her, as much as he can, by his constant questioning allowing Alice to solve her countless dilemmas. Although there isn’t a step for a “sister figure” or “mother figure” I believe the Queen of Hearts and the Duchess appear to be Alice’s sister and mother figures.

(Note: To learn more about how the Queen of Hearts is like a “sister figure” take a peek at Kristen’s “The Queen an Older Sibling?”)

As Alice defends her statements and beliefs to the Duchess, as one example, Alice begins to believe in herself that no one should tell her what’s right or wrong. She also learns to think about what she is about to say, as before, when she would blurt out whatever was on her mind. This is only one of the lessons (morals *wink*) Alice learns throughout her journey.

The ultimate boon is the achievement of the goal of the quest. No not the quest for the Holy Grail but the quest to get into the beautiful garden behind the locked door. Alice learns from her experiences and is rewarded by finally entering the garden. Although it is not the fact she achieved her goal of getting into the garden, but the lessons she learned to reach it.

Stay tune for the final “Hero’s Journey of Alice” (Part 3)!

Image 1 can be found here.

The “Hero’s Journey” of Alice

After studying Joseph Campbell’s “hero journey”, a concept we were introduced to by Mr. Long and later discussed with Matt Langdon,  a visiting expert on the “hero” model who has been commenting on the blogs lately, I am very quickly realizing many, if not all, stories are based off of these steps. Of course there are different ways of approaching this concept like my partner Adam realized in his blog The-Not-So-Heroic-Journey. It all depends on your perspective.

(Note: If you’re interested in these ideas, feel free to check out the earlier posts my classmates and I blogged about Joseph Campbell’s “hero journey”, too, if you want.)

Photobucket

It is hard to pinpoint the exact moment of Alice’s call to adventure, so it is argued in diverse ways. One could believe it is in the very first sentence of Carroll’s story; “Alice was beginning to get very tired”. Another point someone could say is when the White Rabbit suddenly shows up. Nevertheless Alice is called to Wonderland.

I believe there was a refusal of the call. Whether it was the slight second Alice could not believe what the White Rabbit was doing or when she cries each time she is either scared or oblivious how she should handle the situation.

As for the supernatural aid? I assume the White Rabbit aides Alice throughout her adventure and even if the Rabbit has no “powers”, so to speak, the Rabbit is the character who begins Alice’s curiosity that could literally “kill the cat”.

Alice’s drop in the Rabbit-hole coveys the crossing of the first threshold. She is leaving the “real world” and traveling through dimensions until she reaches the hallway to Wonderland.

At the belly of the whale, Alice at this point is at her lowest point in the scene when she grows more than 9 ft. high, although I have not read the entire story to know for sure. Alice does have the “Who am I?” talk to herself where she uses the thought process of René Descartes’ idea of Cartesian Dualism, which leads her 3rd outburst in tears.

(Note: If you are interested in the Scientific Revolution concept that is embedded in the story, I recommend reading Brendon O-L. blog on the Scientific Revolution.)

The road of trials I believe have been occurring sense she arrived into the hallway of doors. There are numerous tasks or signs that Alice sees and undergoes in the first three chapters. I wouldn’t say she “failed” the tasks but merely explored the outcomes of each which provide knowledge for her to use to her advantage in the future. These are in fact critical tasks for her to undergo her transformation.

(Note: To learn more about these tasks and signs take a peek at my “Firsts Thoughts? Of Course I Ought! (Ch.1 part 2)”, if you want)

As I read further into Alice’s journey I will reply in “The “Hero’s Journey” of Alice (part 2)”: Stay Tune!

This image can be found here.

  • Welcome to the “Alice Project”

    What happens when a group of insightful 10th grade students explore Alice's journey into Wonderland?